Marshamallow Althaea officinalis and uses.

Contents

Marshmallow root Suggestions and Administrations.:

Marshmallow Root Extract INCI Name Althaea Officinalis Extract CAS 73049-65-7 EINECS ELINCS No 277-254-6 Mucilage,exopolysaccharid,althea Mortification Root Sweetweed mallards guimauve schloss tea wymote Malve Guimauve Malvavisce photo picture image How much should I take?

 Marshmallow can be made into a hot or cold water tea. Make a tea by adding roots and/or leaves and letting it steep. Drink three to five cups a day. Herbal extracts in capsules and tablets providing 5-6 grams of marshmallow per day can also be used, or it may be taken as a tincture in the amount of 5-15 ml, three times daily.

 A recommended dose of marshmallow is 1 1/-4 teaspoons (6 grams) of the root per day. Marshmallow can be prepared as a tea to be taken 5 times a day. Herbal extracts in capsule and tablet form providing 5-6 grams of marshmallow per day can also be used, or it may be taken as a tincture-1-3 teaspoons (5-15 ml) three times daily.

 Pediatric:Adjust the recommended adult dose to account for the child's weight. Most herbal dosages for adults are calculated on the basis of a 150 lb (70 kg) adult. Therefore, if the child weighs 50 lb (20 to 25 kg), the appropriate dose of marshmallow for this child would be 1/3 of the adult dosage.

 Adult: The following are the recommended adult doses for marshmallow:
 Leaf infusion: 1 to 2 tsp in 5 ounces boiled water, two to three times daily
 Leaf tincture: 1 to 2 tsp (1:5 in 25% ethanol), two to three times daily
 Root infusion or cold-water maceration (2% to 5%): 5 ounces (1 to 2 tsp) taken to soothe cough and sore throat
 Dried root: 2 to 6 g or equivalent preparations daily (cold infusion three times per day)
 Marshmallow cough syrup (from root): 2 to 10 g per single dose (syrup contains sugar, so people with diabetes should use with caution)
 Root topical preparations: 5% to 10% drug in ointment or cream base
 Dried herb/root: 2-5g or by infusion/cold aqueous maceration
 Liquid Extract: 1:1 in 25% alcohol, 2-5ml
 Ointment: 5% powdered leaf/root in ointment base
 Root Syrup (BPC 1949) 2-10ml

 The German Commission E monograph suggests 1.25 teaspoon (6 grams) of the root per day. Marshmallow can be made into a hot or cold water tea. Often 2~3 teaspoons (10~15 grams) of the root and or leaves are used per cup (250 ml) of water. Generally, a full day's amount is steeped overnight when making a cold water tea, 6~9 teaspoons (30~45 grams) per three cups (750 ml) of water, or for fifteen to twenty minutes in hot water. Drink three to five cups (750~1250 ml) a day. Since the plant is so gooey, it does not combine well with other plants. Nevertheless, it can be found in some herbal cough syrups. Herbal extracts in capsules and tablets providing 5~6 grams of marshmallow per day can also be used, or it may be taken as a tincture:1~3 teaspoons (5~15 ml) three times daily.

 Both the leaves and roots of marshmallow may be found in commercial oral dosage forms that include extracts and syrups. Dosing varies according to the type and concentration of the product and the condition being treated. Individuals who decide to use marshmallow should follow the directions on the package that is purchased.

 Teas made from marshmallow may be taken up to three times a day. Marshmallow leaf tea may be made by adding 2 teaspoons to 5 teaspoons of dried leaf to about 5 ounces of hot (but not boiling) water, allowing it to soak for 10 minutes, and then straining out the solid particles. For marshmallow root tea, 2 teaspoons to 5 teaspoons of the dried powdered root may be added to about 5 ounces of warm water and allowed to soak for at least an hour before straining out the solids. The resulting tea may be heated or consumed cold.

 For use on the skin, shredded or powdered marshmallow root may be mixed with enough warm water to form a thick paste, which is often spread onto a soft, clean cloth. The resulting poultice may be heated or simply applied to irritated skin as often as needed. If the skin at the area where marshmallow is applied blisters or becomes more irritated, the marshmallow preparation should be washed off with warm water and it should not be re-applied.

 Standardization:

 Standardization involves measuring the amount of certain chemicals in products to try to make different preparations similar to each other. It is not always known if the chemicals being measured are the "active" ingredients. Pharmacopoeia grade marshmallow must be properly identified by the naked eye and by microscope. The British Pharmacopoeia requires marshmallow leaf to be harvested before the flowering period, and to pass identification by specific scientific tests.

 Adults (18 years and older):

 Skin inflammatory conditions (eczema, psoriasis): Historically, 5-10 grams of marshmallow in ointment or cream base or 5% powdered marshmallow leaf has been applied to the skin three times daily. Daily oral doses of 5 grams of marshmallow leaf, or 6 grams of marshmallow root have been suggested by mouth.

 Oral and pharyngeal irritation: A dose of 2 grams of marshmallow in 1 cup of cold water, soaked for 2 hours then gargled has been used, but is not supported by scientific evidence.

 Children (younger than 18 years):

 There is not enough scientific data to recommend marshmallow for use in children.
Up.

 Side Effects and Warnings:

 Marshmallow is very safe. There have been extremely rare reports of allergic reactions.Although there are no known reports or studies about marshmallow allergy, allergic reactions to marshmallow may occur.

 Marshmallow is generally regarded as safe, and literature review reveals no documented adverse case-reports. However, the potential for marshmallow to cause allergic reactions or low blood sugar has been noted anecdotally.

 It is believed that Marshmallow is entirely safe; however, one study suggests it can affect blood sugar levels, therefore, people with diabetes should use caution when taking this product. Safety in young children, pregnant or nursing women, or those with severe liver or kidney disease is not known at this time.

 Historically, marshmallow is generally regarded as being safe in healthy individuals. However, since studies have not evaluated the safety of marshmallow, proper doses and duration in humans are not known. Allergic reactions may occur.

 Based on animal study, marshmallow may lower blood glucose levels. Caution is advised in patients with diabetes or hypoglycemia, and in those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that affect blood sugar. Serum glucose levels should be monitored closely and medication adjustments may be necessary.

 Precautions:Because marshmallow may possibly reduce blood sugar levels, individuals with diabetes should be careful when taking it. Blood sugar levels may need to be checked more often, as well.

 Caution: When using the tincture for digestive or urinary disorders, hot water should be used to reduce the alcohol content. Cold water extracts should be made if the mucilage content is to be preserved. However, since starch will not dissolve in cold water, if the root is to be used as a gargle for tonsillitis and inflamed gums, where the starch will be of benefit, it should be prepared with hot water.

 Pregnancy and Breastfeeding:There is not enough scientific evidence to support the safe use of marshmallow during pregnancy or breastfeeding.

 Allergies:Although there are no known reports or studies about marshmallow allergy, allergic reactions to marshmallow may occur.
Up.

 Interactions with Drugs:

 Based on animal study, marshmallow may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. A qualified healthcare professional should monitor patients taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or insulin closely. Medication adjustments may be necessary.

 Marshmallow may interfere with the absorption of other drugs and therefore should be taken 1 hour before or 2 hours after other drugs.

 Marshmallow may interfere with the absorption of certain medications. For this reason, it is important to take marshmallow several hours before or after ingesting other herbs or medications.

 Marshmallow (not to be confused with Marshmellows) has traditionally been used internally for inflammation and ulceration of the digestive tract, hiatal hernia, bronchitis, excess mucus, asthma, whooping cough, and cystitis.

 Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements:

 When mixed with water or other fluids, marshmallow forms a sticky, slippery gel. In theory, taking marshmallow by mouth could block the absorption of other drugs that are taken at the same time. Individuals who take marshmallow should not take any other drugs for at least 2 hours.

 Based on animal study, marshmallow may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment. Possible examples include: Aloe vera , American ginseng, bilberry, bitter melon, burdock,fenugreek, fish oil, gymnema, horse chestnut seed extract (HCSE), milk thistle, Panax ginseng, rosemary, Siberian ginseng, stinging nettle and white horehound. Agents that may raise blood sugar levels include: Arginine, cocoa, and ephedra (when combined with caffeine).

 Marshmallow may interfere with the absorption of other agents and therefore should be taken 1 hour before or 2 hours after other herbs and supplements.
Up.

 Summary:

 Marshmallow's genus name, Althea, is derived from the Greek word, althe, which means "to heal." Marshmallow, which is also known as Althea, was originally an ingredient in the candy we also know as Marshmallow, and its powder has been used as a binding agent to hold other herbs together in making pills.

 Marshmallow has been commonly substituted in herbal remedies for Slippery Elm, another herb known for its high mucilage content, because its source, the elm tree, has become endangered, due to Dutch Elm Disease. Marshmallow is a native of most countries of Europe, from Denmark southward, and is also found in the western United States. It grows in salt marshes, in damp meadows, by the sides of ditches, by the sea and on the banks of tidal rivers. Marshmallow has nourished many people. The plant has been utilized for thousands of years, not only as a food during times of famine, but also for its healing properties as an herbal remedy.

 Served as a vegetable, the plant was considered a delicacy among the Romans. During the reign of Charlemagne in the ninth century, Marshmallow was promoted as a cultivated vegetable, and in France, the young tops and leaves are eaten uncooked in salads.

 Primary chemical constituents in Marshmallow include substantial mucilage, polysaccharides, flavonoids (quercetin), kaempferol, asparagine, tannins, lecithin and pectin. The great demulcent and emollient properties of Marshmallow make it useful in inflammation and irritation of the alimentary canal and of the urinary and respiratory organs.

 Recently, Marshmallow has been used as an expectorant to treat a variety of upper respiratory problems. Marshmallow also contains large amounts of vitamin A, calcium, zinc and significant amounts of iron, sodium, iodine and B-complex vitamins. Like slippery elm, Marshmallow reduces inflammation and has a calming effect on the body. The active constituents in Marshmallow are large carbohydrate (sugar) molecules, which make up the mucilage. This smooth, slippery substance can soothe and protect irritated mucous membranes. Although Marshmallow has primarily been used for the respiratory and digestive tracts, its high mucilage content may also provide some minor relief for urinary tract and skin infections. Marshmallow's mucilage content helps soothe inflamed tissues often caused by bronchitis, and it also relieves dryness and irritation in the chest and throat, usually brought on by colds and persistent coughs. Marshmallow has been known to relieve indigestion, kidney problems, urinary tract infections and even external skin wounds such as boils and abscesses.
Up.

PrevNext

Reference:
  • 1.Marshamallow Althaea officinalis and uses.

♥The article and literature was edited by herbalist of MDidea Extracts Professional.It runs a range of online descriptions about the titled herb and related phytochemicals,including comprehensive information related,summarized updating discoveries from findings of herbalists and clinical scientists from this field.The electronic data information published at our official website www.mdidea.com and www.mdidea.net,we tried best to update it to latest and exact as possible.
♣ last edit date:

Available Product
  • Name:Marshmallow Root Extract
  • Serie No:R037.
  • Specifications:10:1TLC
  • INCI Name:ALTHAEA OFFICINALIS EXTRACT
  • EINECS/ELINCS No.:277-254-6
  • CAS: 73049-65-7
  • Chem/IUPAC Name:Althaea Officinalis Extract is an extract of the roots of the marshmallow,Althaea officinalis,Malvaceae
  • Other Names:Althea Root Extract.Marshmallow,Althaea officinalis,Althea Root,althaea radix,Althaeae folium,althaea leaf,Althaea officinalis L. var robusta,Guimauve,Racine De Guimauve,Malvavisco,Apothekerstockmalve,Malve,Eibischwurzel,bismalva,buonvischio,malvacioni,Malvavisce,gul hatem,Mallards,Guimauve,Witte malve,Sweetweed,Herba Malvae,Wymote,Mortification Root,mortification plant,Hock Herb,Schloss Tea,Shu Kui.

See Specification Details

Product Display
Marshmallow Root Extract INCI Name Althaea Officinalis Extract CAS 73049-65-7 EINECS ELINCS No 277-254-6 Mucilage,exopolysaccharid,althea Mortification Root Sweetweed mallards guimauve schloss tea wymote Malve Guimauve Malvavisce

See Display Details